Americanized remakes of foreign films are tricky, often awful business. They're typically dumbed-down affairs built for a mass audience that can't be bothered with subtitles.

Americanized remakes of foreign films are tricky, often awful business. They're typically dumbed-down affairs built for a mass audience that can't be bothered with subtitles.

So I went into "Let Me In" with reserved expectations. The original, "Let the Right One In," was one of my favorite Swedish vampire movies of all time. It was creepy, atmospheric, haunting and oddly sweet.

Did they get it right? Close enough that I still strongly recommend it.

Owen (Kodi Smit-McPhee) is a scrawny 12-year-old, bullied at school and with seemingly no friends.

He strikes up a quiet kinship with similarly skittish new neighbor Abby (Chloe Grace Moretz). Abby is also 12 years old, although she's been 12 much longer than Owen, primarily because she's a vampire.

I'll be the first to admit that this adaptation - written and directed by Matt Reeves ("Cloverfield") - is missing some of the atmosphere (and some of the subtlety) of the original.

Yet I still strongly recommend it, because a lot of you will never see "Let the Right One In." And this is a pretty great facsimile.

Moretz ("Kick-Ass") and Smit-McPhee ("The Road") are as fine a pairing of young actors as I've seen in forever. Their ill-fated friendship found in isolation is key to making the whole film work, and lesser talents would have killed it.

Even if vampire lore is more than a little played out in our culture right now, both the remake and original stand among the best vampire movies ever.