Before Facebook became the ubiquitous, indispensable time-suck it is today - and long before your mom got an account and ruined everything - it was a brilliantly simple idea hatched in a dorm room.

Before Facebook became the ubiquitous, indispensable time-suck it is today - and long before your mom got an account and ruined everything - it was a brilliantly simple idea hatched in a dorm room.

"The Social Network" is the story of that idea. It's not the typical greed and corruption story I kind of expected. It's something far better, a stellar bit of entertainment and one of the year's best films.

It was fall 2003 on the campus of Harvard. Young and gifted computer programmer Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg), freshly dumped by his girlfriend, turns a bit of bored hacking into the snowball of an idea that becomes "The Facebook."

Tellingly, much of the story is told in flashback. It's framed by a lawsuit brought by upperclassmen who partnered with Zuckerberg on a similar idea and another by Zuckerberg's closest, and possibly only, friend, Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield).

Director David Fincher - working from an outstanding script by TV guru Aaron Sorkin - continues to evolve into one of the finest filmmakers working today. This is some of the best storytelling of his career.

I found the Zuckerberg character elicited far more sympathy than I expected. Maybe that's because Eisenberg's performance is as ambitious as what he's portraying. Then again, maybe I just relate to a-holes.

In fact, overall, this is a story of putting an idea above everything - both friends and profits. I can't click the "Like" button enough for this flick. Don't miss it.