His demo blew minds, but Nick Tolford always envisioned something more, a record that was warm and alive.

His demo blew minds, but Nick Tolford always envisioned something more, a record that was warm and alive.

Those solo apartment songs recorded in 2009 served to announce that the friendly, bearded sound engineer was a bona fide soul man in disguise. Still, he wanted a debut LP that could really capture the vintage soul of the '60s, that unmistakable texture of the records he had torn through growing up.

This weekend, his dream comes true.

Nick Tolford and Company will release the vinyl edition of "Extraordinary Love" Saturday at Carabar, headquarters of Tolford's transformation from everyman prog bassist to show-stopping crooner.

"The demo was all me, so I didn't want to put that out," Tolford said. "The feel of a live record is much more what we were going for than me doing tracks in my apartment."

If you've experienced the Company at work, the record will feel right. It was tracked live, recorded to two-inch tape and cut in a day. It's the method responsible for the distinct texture of albums by Sam Cooke, Otis Redding, The Temptations and other legends.

"We didn't overdub anything, except we doubled the girls," Tolford said of sessions at local recording house Musicol. "You can feel that it's people."

Though it bears modern touches, the album boldly adopts the trademarks of classic soul and R&B. There's a break-neck opener in "I Kissed Her," a bluesy lament in "Leave Me Alone" and even a throwback finger-snap a cappella on "End of the Night."

"Extraordinary Love" is a reminder of everything great about classic soul.

"All I can hope for is that people dance," Tolford said. "That means I'm doing my job."