For reasons ranging from physical health to environmental sustainability, the local food movement has increasing influence on the minds of conscious eaters.

For reasons ranging from physical health to environmental sustainability, the local food movement has increasing influence on the minds of conscious eaters.

They've heard the rallying cry to focus on regional and seasonal dietary options and responded through their spending habits, changing shopping destinations and supporting like-minded restaurants or events such as Local Foods Week.

As an artist and curator, Eva Ball has watched the movement appraisingly and somewhat skeptically.

"In the media, we're talking about our diets and have been for a long time," she explained. "Now the movement for local and slow foods is seen as a solution to the problems, but in a lot of ways it's just a market taking hold of something. It's not a solution. For someone in a high-rise in New York City, that's not going to be an option."

Her own response is "Delusion of Eating," an exhibition co-curated by fellow artist Ian Ruffino (they collaborate under the name Vince Chocolate) that presents work from a dozen artists and writers from around the country.

Most suggest that while marketing has its effect, our strongest connections to food aren't made through the conscious mind but through primal instinct.

A sensual undercurrent swells within the work of Houston-based food writer Janice Schindeler, who adds new dimension to the comforts of pizza and burgers by rendering them in fabric large enough for sitting or reclining.

In "Loving Soup," Dina Sherman forms a literal heart shape from alphabet soup pasta and cupped palms, with the letters that spell "love" pulled out for jarring and sharing with friends.

In other pieces, sensuality ripens into open sexuality, most notably works by Dan Olsen that present nudes, fast food and a candid history of his intimate culinary encounters on paper grocery bags, and combine a hardcore porn video with a very strategically placed cupcake.

Through the show's run, Ball and Ruffino will expand on its theme with a full-color catalogue, available Oct. 21, featuring original essays by writers including James Payne and Cincinnati's Matt Morris, as well as a curators' lecture on Nov. 11 and a night of performances Nov. 26.