Cincinnati's Foxy Shazam makes no bones about their desire to become the biggest band in the world. Fearless, flamboyant anthem writers in the lineage of Queen, The Darkness and "Rocky Horror," they are the self-described "Michael Jordan of rock 'n' roll."

Cincinnati's Foxy Shazam makes no bones about their desire to become the biggest band in the world. Fearless, flamboyant anthem writers in the lineage of Queen, The Darkness and "Rocky Horror," they are the self-described "Michael Jordan of rock 'n' roll."

They aren't quite headlining the Super Bowl halftime show yet, though their single "Unstoppable" was featured over a highlights package during this year's broadcast. Since then, Foxy Shazam has taken their exuberant stage show worldwide, including stops at Lollapalooza, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the British festival circuit.

That won't stop them from playing their hearts out Monday when they co-headline The Summit with party-hearty classic rock specialists Free Energy.

"It doesn't matter where I am or who I'm in front of," frontman Eric Sean Nally said on the phone last week. "When it's time to go, it's time to go."

Nally is scrawny, mustachioed and prone to wearing extremely tight pants. He writes lyrics like "Life is a b----, but she's totally doable." He'll do seemingly anything to keep his audience stimulated.

"The biggest advice I could give someone is that you just can't be scared to do things. A lot of times I try things and it's stupid, but sometimes I'll come upon something that's awesome and I'll put it in my bag of awesome things to do," Nally said. "That goes for everything - writing a song, telling a joke. Anything that takes creative effort."

For someone who thrives on spontaneity, Nally is just as passionate about the need for patience and perseverance. That's why he's willing to bring arena-ready enthusiasm to even the dankest dive bars and win over fans one at a time.

"I want to do it right. I want to take it slow and go step by step," Nally said. "I don't want to go bam - big song on the radio and then get huge and make millions of dollars and then fizzle out as fast we came in. I'm all about creating this extremely strong foundation underneath our success so that when we're getting really tall and we've built this thing up to the clouds, it's not going to fall over."