"Chicks with big rollers" might suggest a day at the beauty salon with Grandma or the women in polyester pantsuits caught up in the chase scene in "Raising Arizona." In November, printmaker Sophie Knee wants to bring something different to mind.

"Chicks with big rollers" might suggest a day at the beauty salon with Grandma or the women in polyester pantsuits caught up in the chase scene in "Raising Arizona." In November, printmaker Sophie Knee wants to bring something different to mind.

"Chicks with Big Rollers," the show she has curated for Ohio Art League, brings together five artists making large work through various printmaking methods (the big rollers are for spreading ink). Each also incorporates tools of other mediums.

Coincidentally, they're all women, Knee said, but generationally they span from Gen Y to baby boomer.

As she explained, "In printmaking, you tend to work in a shared environment because you need a large press to make large prints. It's an area you meet a lot of people in, in a good way."

Outside studio work led Knee to Sherrill Massey, who adds colored pencil and gouache to her monotypes; Kathy McGhee, whose solarplate etchings have a photographic precision; and Hilary Hilario, who uses her prints as material for collage and cut-outs.

Through them she met Mariana Smith, for whom printmaking is a gateway to site-specific installation work involving materials including video and found objects. Knee's own work, like Massey's, adds a painterly element through a variety of palettes in watercolor.

"One of the cool things about printmaking is it has a lot of different possibilities," Knee said. "It connects with a lot of different disciplines."

A shared interest in the everyday also attracted Knee to this group. Along with her self-portraits, generated from photos shot with an old Pentax and a bathroom mirror, Hilario will present a wall full of collaged pigeons. McGhee will show a loving portrait of a hedge apple, and from Massey comes a celebration of an eggbeater.