You're probably missing out on the best show on TV right now. Everyone should be watching "Terriers" every week, but it's been plagued by low ratings. While FX has promised to finish the first season's 13-episode run, it has not given a green-light for more episodes. Here's why you should being watching "Terriers" and rooting for a second season.

You're probably missing out on the best show on TV right now. Everyone should be watching "Terriers" every week, but it's been plagued by low ratings. While FX has promised to finish the first season's 13-episode run, it has not given a green-light for more episodes. Here's why you should being watching "Terriers" and rooting for a second season.

5. It isn't about dogs or dog fighting or dog pageants

Pay no attention to the misleading title and a poor advertising campaign. It's about two down-and-out private investigators, Hank Dolworth (Donal Logue) and Britt Pollack (Michael Raymond-James). Each week, they tackle a seemingly simple case - marital infidelity, missing person, etc. - that twists and turns into a complex puzzle for our heroes to piece together.

4. The writing is brilliant

Led by showrunners Ted Griffin ("Ocean's Eleven") and Shawn Ryan ("The Shield"), "Terriers" combines procedural elements with serialized character-based arcs.

The week-to-week cases parallel the characters' larger narratives with subtlety and deft. And an overall corruption mythology from the early episodes will return as the season reaches its climax.

3. Thi s is splendid noir TV

With that corruption storyline along with dramatic shadows and an overall grainy look, "Terriers" is reminiscent of the neo-noir classic "Chinatown." Yes, it does noir that well.

2. It's both h ilarious and tragic

One minute you're laughing as Hank and Britt banter about everything from waffle makers to the correct phrase to use when serving a restraining order - it's you've been served, not got served, because "it's not an urban dance competition." The next you're on the edge of your seat as an extremely dark twist or shocking bit of violence grabs you out of nowhere.

1. Logue and Raymond-James are terrific

These two real-life friends are the best on-screen private detective duo of all time. They each show great range in lighthearted and emotionally intense performances. Logue deserves some serious award consideration.