"That soccer bar moving in ruined our neighborhood," said Chris Lutzko, perched alongside The Unholy Two bandmates Adam Smith and Bo Davis at The Summit.

"That soccer bar moving in ruined our neighborhood," said Chris Lutzko, perched alongside The Unholy Two bandmates Adam Smith and Bo Davis at The Summit.

"That's why we have to do the release party at Skylab instead of out in Washington Beach. Soccer, you know, they fall down on purpose. Kind of indie rock, you know what I mean? Indie rock, kind of gay, you know?"

By Washington Beach, Lutzko means the North Campus neighborhood situated around Cafe Bourbon Street and The Summit that was the breeding ground for the city's greatest punk and experimental bands half a decade ago. The Unholy Two was one of the last notable groups to emerge from that scene, an outlet for Lutzko's comically inflammatory self expression.

They've become more formidable since forming in 2006, concocting music loud and abrasive enough to elicit the same stomach-churning reaction as the frontman's rants.

It's not about being angry, they explained. It's about being mean.

"We're putting the Nazi back in rock," Lutzko said, citing villainous pro wrestlers Kevin Sullivan and The Purple Haze, occult blood rituals and the voyeuristic writing of alleged pedophile Peter Sotos as ingredients for debut LP "Skum of the Earth."

They'll celebrate the album Saturday at Skylab with a beautifully brusque set of performers including Cheater Slicks, Puffy Areolas, Pop. 1280, Funerals, Fey Gods and Burleson/Jewell.

"Skum of the Earth" carries the torch for a line of rock provocateurs that includes Big Black, Pussy Galore and Pissed Jeans. Lutzko seems to have worked hard to write the most incendiary lyrics possible. After early songs like "Kutter" indulged in masochism, these songs are about exerting power.

"We don't fall down on purpose," Lutzko said. "We're like the exact opposite of soccer."