Takeshi Moro took a self portrait on the 2008 anniversary of the Pearl Harbor bombings that inspired two years' worth of work.

Takeshi Moro took a self portrait on the 2008 anniversary of the Pearl Harbor bombings that inspired two years' worth of work.

In the photo he's bowing in the traditional Japanese symbol of apology on stark white snow and wearing a bright red coat. The contrast alludes to the country's flag, representing national pride and guilt in one striking swoop.

"Every year I have trouble on that date," said the Tokyo-born artist, who is a photography professor at Otterbein. "The weight of that history, even though I wasn't alive then, still resonates. Should I be apologetic? Should I just remove myself from it? It's a complex thought process."

That photo led him to address others' approaches to guilt and forgiveness in a series called "Collecting Apologies," part of which will be on display at ROY G BIV during this weekend's Gallery Hop.

Each photo shows a person who shared a sin, shot in a related location. They're all performing the same Japanese bow.

The transgressions vary from profound to light-hearted (such as the photo of a girl bowing in a slovenly room, called "Krysta - My mother cleaned my room until I was 18").

But the wrong isn't always obvious, much like in life.

"They are ambiguous to some degree," Moro said. "There's an implied narrative to each photograph, but I want the viewer to have room to interpret."

Moro's work will be complemented at ROY G BIV by an exhibit of art by David Staniunas. The Philadelphia painter uses shocking neon color schemes and sad figures to satirize neoliberal ideologies and question the cult of technology.


Sean Christopher Gallery

Installation artist Herb Vincent Peterson has created text-based works inspired by the modern idea of being saved and the fear of being denied the optimal afterlife.

Religious iconography is subtly strewn throughout the installations, such as in "Is Your Soul Saved," created with 100 pounds of painted nails glued to the wall. "And at the Hour of Our Death," a line from the Lord's Prayer, consists of the phrase handwritten repetitiously on the wall.


Rebecca Ibel Gallery

A new show highlights the wooden works of Tom Chapin. The mahogany and rosewood sculptures echo the artist's fascination with the natural world, which, in addition to ancient philosophy, inspires many of his pieces. Be on the lookout for the suggestion of biological growth and atomic reactions in the carvings as well.