If Derouen established a hub for music's lunatic fringe, David Lewis is aiming to inject family values into the record business.

If Derouen established a hub for music's lunatic fringe, David Lewis is aiming to inject family values into the record business.

A former employee of Austin record sellers Inner Sanctum, Sound Exchange and Waterloo Records, Lewis had been working at Borders' Columbus distribution center for nearly a decade when he found himself out of work in 2008. His wife suggested he make some money by returning to his old pastime of selling records.

"This is in my blood," said Lewis, 48. "This is what I know how to do."

If Lewis' wife encouraged the pursuit, his five-year-old daughter, Elizabeth, inspired it. "Her enthusiasm for music kind of buoyed the whole thing," Lewis said.

Like Derouen, Lewis started buying albums online and soon found himself with a garage full of vinyl. Dissatisfied with the available retail spaces, he decided to open Elizabeth's Records in the SouthPointe Marketplace flea market last year.

Business came in spurts, and Lewis often considered closing shop. Still, he kept pursuing his passion even as he took a distribution job at Micro Center to pay the bills. When the chance to open a proper storefront came along, Lewis jumped at it.

He's partnering with Dane Runyon and Ron Miller, a pair of faithful Elizabeth's customers, to take over a pair of connected Clintonville storefronts on Indianola Avenue near Studio 35. Lewis will run a new and improved Elizabeth's on one side; Runyon, 29, and Miller, 25, are opening a high-end audio equipment store called Satori Audio on the other.

Lewis plans to have the new Elizabeth's open by next week to capitalize on holiday gift shopping, with a grand opening tentatively slated for Record Store Day in April. In the interim, he hopes to establish the kind of place adults can enjoy and where children can discover classic music the way Elizabeth has.

"Little kids need to learn about T. Rex," Lewis said. "It's more than a dinosaur."