When Jason Wilson wanted black-and-white photos of Columbus to hang above his couch, he picked up his camera. The result was not just great home decor - it was the beginning of a business.

When Jason Wilson wanted black-and-white photos of Columbus to hang above his couch, he picked up his camera. The result was not just great home decor - it was the beginning of a business.

The photographer has been taking black-and-white photos of the capital city for six years as the man behind the lens at Metroscap in German Village.

Wilson's popular photos - one of his most-requested landmarks is the Union Station arch in the Arena District - are usually sold matted in a black frame. But he sells unframed prints as well, leaving the styling up to the buyer.

We asked two stylists from local home decor stores to take a print of Wilson's photo "Moonrise" and frame it however they saw fit. Here's what they came up with.


Who: Katie Palmer, owner of SoBo Style in Clintonville

How she styled it : Palmer framed the photo in a salvaged window frame backed with collaged pages from an antique book.

"The effect of the glass window adds another dimension to the photograph," Palmer said.

She tore the book's pages to create a weathered feel for the background (the same look can be created with any kind of old paper, from ledger books to newspapers). Glass knobs at the bottom transform the frame into a useful hook board.

The final product reflects SoBo's "belief in re-using salvaged material in a functional way," Palmer said.


Who: Suzi West, owner of Collier West in the Short North

How she styled it: "I am a huge advocate of highlighting art in easy, economical ways," West said.

She hung the photo on a wood and silver clipboard and positioned that on a small easel. Other minimalist tactics can include hanging the photo with T-pins or contrasting artist's tape. Incorporating other artwork or objects helps add depth and composition, West said.

Another way to share the story of a black-and-white photo is to hang it in an antique frame.

"I love the character of an old frame," West said, "and it greatly reduces the cost of buying new framing materials."