Considering how much space there is in the Franklinton house where Old Hundred practices, it's funny to see them cram into a tiny upstairs bedroom to craft their ever-evolving indie folk. The only thing spread out about their method is the sounds they've been conjuring.

Considering how much space there is in the Franklinton house where Old Hundred practices, it's funny to see them cram into a tiny upstairs bedroom to craft their ever-evolving indie folk. The only thing spread out about their method is the sounds they've been conjuring.

The claustrophobic approach makes sense in a way. These guys have been making music on their own for years. Old Hundred finds their inspirations converging into something more satisfying.

"It's not designed to be a frontman-centric sort of project," Blake Skidmore said, though the singer-guitarist essentially served as the creative leader at the band's outset in February 2009.

That's when Nate Gelinas and Jon Helm moved from Boston to shack up at Skidmore's place. They were basically strangers, but within a month they were jamming on every sort of strummed instrument and unleashing hair-raising vocal harmonies. Longtime Columbus solo act Hal Hixson joined the fold by summertime.

The project's starting point was Skidmore's rousing folk stompers. Those morphed in the hands of his collaborators, growing into something like a collision between Fleet Foxes and Death Cab for Cutie.

Compare early live recordings with the studio album they're unveiling Saturday at Carabar - "You can hear the songs evolve from Blake Skidmore songs into Old Hundred songs," Skidmore said.

Five months of recording sessions this year at Oranjudio only expanded Old Hundred's horizons. For instance, "Say It Again," once an accordion-powered folk dirge, grew into an exhilarating wash of lush ambient sounds.

The self-titled CD finds Hixson and Gelinas submitting songs, a trend the band said will continue as they write, record and tour. Thus far, putting their heads together has yielded more than the sum of its parts.

"There are tensions," Skidmore said, "but they're good tensions."

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