If you've heard anything about "127 Hours," you've probably heard reports of fainting during a graphic (but brief) scene near the film's climax.

If you've heard anything about "127 Hours," you've probably heard reports of fainting during a graphic (but brief) scene near the film's climax.

If you aren't a fan of the "Saw" films and think you will skip this movie, I have a message for you. Grow a pair and gut it out, or you're going to miss one of the year's best, most life-affirming movies.

Based on a true story, it tells the tale of Aron Ralston (James Franco), an outdoor adventurer who goes hiking in a remote park in Utah.

A tiny misstep leaves Aron trapped in a canyon, his arm pinned by a boulder. With little chance of rescue, his survival rests on his ingenuity and sheer will.

"127 Hours" is almost entirely footage of a man trapped alone. The fact that it is not only amazingly watchable but one of the most moving pictures of the year is testament to two people.

Director Danny Boyle - coming off his Oscar win for "Slumdog Millionaire" - again shows he can work magic with a story that a lesser director would bungle. His visual flair keeps things moving while his lead character can't.

But he also gets a brilliant, exhausting performance from Franco. This movie gets such a visceral reaction because he places the audience so firmly in his dilemma - not just in the onscreen gruesomeness.