A showcase for the mega voices of Christina Aguilera and Cher, "Burlesque" has also been a production marked by infighting, script doctoring and reshoots. While many opinions have guided the flashy musical's arrival to the big screen, ultimately, none of them were of much use.

A showcase for the mega voices of Christina Aguilera and Cher, "Burlesque" has also been a production marked by infighting, script doctoring and reshoots. While many opinions have guided the flashy musical's arrival to the big screen, ultimately, none of them were of much use.

In a story as old as Busby Berkeley, Aguilera is Ali, an Iowa waitress who follows her big dreams of performing to a burlesque club in L.A., where she quickly becomes a breakout star.

Meanwhile, sparks develop between Aguilera and a bartender, played by Cam Gigandet. And club owner Tess (Cher) frets over bank liens while fending off an aggressive developer (Eric Dane) who wants her property and Ali.

Onto this rickety base of a plot are piled some substantial problems: director Steve Antin's dramatic touch, which can't distinguish lightweight from weightless; cinematography and editing choices that lack rhythm or sense; and flirtatious banter between Aguilera and Gigandet that's so stiff you could iron on it.

Cher and Aguilera each get a share of show-stopping moments, but costar Alan Cumming is completely wasted, and Kristen Bell, as a rival dancer, is forced to play one whiny note (at least she gets the film's best line).

From all angles, it's as random and scattered as a blast of buckshot - or a hit from a glitter gun.