As a fan of the random assortment of "found treasures" at retail chains like Urban Outfitters and Anthropologie, Rhome Ruanphae wanted to have a similar sort of variety at his new Short North shop, The Attic.

As a fan of the random assortment of "found treasures" at retail chains like Urban Outfitters and Anthropologie, Rhome Ruanphae wanted to have a similar sort of variety at his new Short North shop, The Attic.

Ruanphae - who owns the building as well as the restaurant next door, Basil - thought he'd make use of the storefront by turning his hobby of "collecting stuff" into a business.

The collection of home decor, furnishings, clothing and accessories all have a vintage feel that suits the store's name.

"All the pieces here are things I find here locally. There's not a lot of stuff that's mass-produced," said Ruanphae, who has worked at Abercrombie and Express in the past.

Much of the merchandise, like beaded tapestries and small statues, came from Ruanphae's mother. Furniture, luggage and costume jewelry were picked up from estate sales, and the two or three racks of men's and women's clothing appear to be top-notch thrift store finds.

And while the hand-picked selection varies day to day, there are some things you can always expect to find there. The Attic serves as a Short North outlet for a few local, much-loved businesses: Pattycake Bakery, Bakery Gingham, Candle Lab, Badcock Apparel and Stauf's Coffee. Basil already had a relationship with most of those places, which is why he describes the new shop as "kind of like a retail component of the restaurant."

That synergy continues with the store's hours: The Attic is open during the evening, allowing diners to become shoppers and giving people plenty of time to get in before work.

It's created an atmosphere people enjoy, manager Colleen Kelley said.

"People say, 'Too bad you don't have seating, because it's cool and you've got good music,'" she said. "'I could hang out here.'"