Brian Reaume and Nancy Carlson met 10 years ago when he bought his first piece of furniture - "as everyone should," he says - from her store beneath the Greystone apartment building in the Short North.

Brian Reaume and Nancy Carlson met 10 years ago when he bought his first piece of furniture - "as everyone should," he says - from her store beneath the Greystone apartment building in the Short North.

Little did either know that, years later, customer and creator would be spending 10-plus hours a day together.

The two have teamed up as co-owners to create products and a new direction for the tiny shop.

Carlson has transformed salvaged items into collaged artworks at the space for 15 years. For her, selecting a business partner was as tricky as finding the right photo for her decoupaged pieces.

But after seeing how well Reaume did while watching over the store this July, Carlson knew she had found him.

"He was certainly the right person," Carlson said. "We seem to have the same vision for the product and the environment we're trying to create."

The two can finish each other's sentences and describe themselves as long-lost twins. Translation: Nancy's Shop, as it used to be called, won't change much; everything will just be enhanced.

"She's become so iconic," said Reaume, who works with Junctionview and is the artist behind Birchwater Studios. "It's all about respect for Nancy and what she does."

They're adopting a new name - The Shop at 815 - and have a bevy of gifts under $20 on sale for the holidays.

"We have some quirky stuff stored away," Reaume said, such as 1960s ashtrays, colorful cigar boxes, pottery and vintage nativity scene pieces customers can mix and match.

Carlson's decoupaged furniture, windows and decor will still be available, with almost every piece priced between $10 and $40.

Reaume will be selling canvases of his paintings, which have been tagged around $600 to $700, and he will create decor pieces as well.

"I think Nancy's is the last stronghold of independent and affordable places in the Short North," Reaume said. "That's why we've rolled out slowly. We don't want people to think this is turning into a boutique. It's high-scale but still affordable. We want you to give a piece of art a home."