Since we were kids, "The Nutcracker" has been the same ballet, with the same music, same choreography and the same oversized mouse that's up to no good. But if you look carefully, you'll see that there's something fresh about BalletMet's production.

Since we were kids, "The Nutcracker" has been the same ballet, with the same music, same choreography and the same oversized mouse that's up to no good. But if you look carefully, you'll see that there's something fresh about BalletMet's production.

During the end of the first act, the protagonists Clara and the Nutcracker travel to the Land of Snow and are greeted by a group of dancing snowflakes. This year, that corps of dancers' new costumes actually resemble snowflakes.

"To be making a whole chorus new costumes for a show with this many costumes is quite a big deal," said Rebecca Turk, BalletMet's costume director. The production has about 250 costumes total, and the ballet's staff has been working on the new attire since July.

The old costumes hadn't been redesigned in about 20 years, and they were on their last (albeit graceful) leg. When Turk designed the new costumes, she hoped to retain the old outfits' sense of movement but use geometrical patterns just like real snow.

"As [the dancers] do certain turns, they splay out like the six points of a snowflake," she said.