Taken to its logical conclusion, rock 'n' roll leaves adherents raunchy, ragged and foaming at the mouth. That's what former Tough and Lovely singer Lara Yazvac had in mind when she teamed with ex-Grafton growler Lou Poster to form The Ferals.

Taken to its logical conclusion, rock 'n' roll leaves adherents raunchy, ragged and foaming at the mouth. That's what former Tough and Lovely singer Lara Yazvac had in mind when she teamed with ex-Grafton growler Lou Poster to form The Ferals.

Burned out on taking their bands seriously, the Columbus rock icons wanted to have fun with music again. They aimed for "stripped-down and sleazy" - music as natural as shagging in the bushes and perfectly suited for such uncouth behavior.

"The things I love are really primal," Yazvac said. "I wanted to do something really primitive, something that people who live in the woods would make."

They kicked the idea around for years before Poster finally booked them a show at Cafe Bourbon Street last summer to get the ball rolling. They stuck fellow Bourbon Street bartender Victoria Mahnke behind a two-piece drum set and let 'er rip.

"We'll do stuff under the gun," Poster said, "but it comes out very natural because we don't have to overthink it."

An eight-hour practice days before their debut was Mahnke's first time drumming. They spent half the rehearsal concocting the deranged zombie look that has evolved with each performance.

As for The Ferals' sound, Poster calls it "novelty foxtrot." A crackling three-song demo recorded by Times New Viking's Jared Phillips captures the unhinged spirit they've conjured on Columbus stages this fall.

They took the show on the road, too, and were pleased to discover their simple setup means they can fit all gear and personnel into a two-door Civic. Loading their equipment takes just one trip.

"It takes us longer to put on our makeup," Yazvac said.

Next up: a New Year's Eve bash at The Summit with The Washington Beach Bums, Exwhites and Good Company.