If Ted Feighan's music sounds like he's basking in a permanent vacation, it's because he feels like a weight's been lifted off his shoulders.

If Ted Feighan's music sounds like he's basking in a permanent vacation, it's because he feels like a weight's been lifted off his shoulders.

When Feighan makes his debut as Monster Rally on Saturday at The Treehouse, it will contrast starkly with his previous gig as bassist for Cleveland teeny-bopper punks Driver Side Impact.

That project, founded with high school friends in 2004, was a constant stress. Feighan spent more time worrying about MySpace plays, Alternative Press mentions and getting his curly hair to do the "scene swoop" than enjoying music. They signed to Victory Records and toured relentlessly without fanfare.

By December 2007, Feighan had had enough. He quit, spent a year studying at DePaul then transferred to Ohio State to be with his girlfriend.

Inspiration struck last spring. Feighan bought a sampler and began dissecting thrift-store LPs to conjure half-remembered dreams. The surreal hip-hop instrumentals came easily - within two weeks a Monster Rally EP was streaming online.

"I was trying to make music that sounded like it could have been played by a live band," Feighan said, "like you're just finding this record and it's decades old."

He produced at a prolific pace. Soon influential music blogs caught on, as did California's Gold Robot Records. It'll release Feighan's first LP, "Coral," this month.

All this unfolded before Monster Rally performed live. At Saturday's show with Way Yes and Monolithic Cloud Parade, he'll recreate his splices on the spot. A refusal to use sequencing software means Feighan's fingers will be busy.

"I have to be hitting [the sampler] or else I don't feel like I'm actually playing," he explained. His 40-minute set will be backed with a video collage.

He's eager to unveil his brainchild without the pressure of Hot Topic rock: "It's much better to make music this way that I'm really pleased with."