More than 1,000 small blocks of wood stamped with a bright yellow logo have been placed around the city since The Bus Project started in 2007. They sit in windowsills and atop crumbling bricks, waiting to be plucked by passersby. Founder Matt Logsdon hopes his public-art initiative will get people to slow down and find something special about where they live.

More than 1,000 small blocks of wood stamped with a bright yellow logo have been placed around the city since The Bus Project started in 2007. They sit in windowsills and atop crumbling bricks, waiting to be plucked by passersby. Founder Matt Logsdon hopes his public-art initiative will get people to slow down and find something special about where they live.

I grew up riding a BMX bike. If you skateboard or ride BMX, the way you look at a city is totally different than your average pedestrian walking by. I was already out scouring the streets looking for fun stuff to ride for years and years. That has some pretty heavy influences on my interest in the pedestrian.

I presented the first 1,000 buses without giving any context, just to see how people would respond. Some spaces I am particularly fond of, and I hope that people notice the tactfulness in which I stuck it. For every one that I find like that, there are 10 that are pretty boring. They're just there because I know people will be by.

This is where art comes in for me. Artists are interested in challenging preconceived notions. They just find everything fascinating in the world, and their job is to try to show you that it's fascinating.

The best advice I've ever received is show up.

Thebusproject.com is where the project comes together. I record wherever I drop these. People are going to be able to go onto the website, register which bus number they have and record where they found it and their contact.

I wanted the project to be interactive. I really want it to be about getting people outside of their house and in these public spaces to appreciate what their surroundings are like. I feel really good about how things have turned out.

I'm always tickled when I can get one up really high. It'll be there for months, and then when it's gone, you're like, "Whoa! Somebody really wanted that."

Three things I can't live without are art, physical activity and my bike.

Know someone doing cool things around Columbus? E-mail John Ross at jross@columbusalive.com.