When Justin Korn and Vannessa Celotto attended a recent horse race in Del Mar, California, they embraced the equestrian sporting tradition of wearing extravagant hats.

When Justin Korn and Vannessa Celotto attended a recent horse race in Del Mar, California, they embraced the equestrian sporting tradition of wearing extravagant hats.

Celotto designed a few for herself and some friends to wear in a millinery competition. Her hat was outfitted with a live fish in a fish bowl .

"It was very classy," she said with a laugh. "Very British."

Despite losing to a man in a hat topped with a fake horse on a life-size surfboard ("As impossible as what you're envisioning sounds, that's exactly what it looked like," Korn said), the seed for a business idea was planted.

The couple launched VeeChay during last year's Fashion Week Columbus. They sell one-of-a-kind hats and headbands out of their Lewis Center home, and they began offering the looks online last month.

Korn, a 29-year-old project manager at Nationwide, handles the business side of VeeChay but uses his fashion industry experience - he's a model - to help Celotto choose colors and edit the use of "glittery bits," her term for the jewels she uses in some of her designs.

The bubbly Celotto, also 29, was an interior designer in L.A. before she moved to Columbus. While you won't find any hats with live fish, she says the diversity of VeeChay is what makes it stand out.

"There's something for all ages, races and outings," Celotto said. "I want people to be inspired and use fashion to express themselves. The looks are funky, simple, sweet or romantic."

VeeChay's signature is a fake flower, which adorns nearly every headband. Some of the headbands elegantly mix the flowers with feathers and birdcage veils. Looks start at $35.

"I love headbands," Celotto said. "I wear one with everything. It really pulls a look together."

VeeChay hats, priced up to $175, follow the Kentucky Derby aesthetic - big, bold and beautiful.

There are winter knit hats and ear warmers as well, and a line of Buckeye headbands in OSU colors with tiny football pendants have been a hit. Also popular are matching sets designed for a fashionista and her miniature pup. Quilted doggie jackets with flowers that echo the owner's headband sell for $75.

"There are a lot of vanilla, mass-produced headbands out there," Celotto said. "We're going for the trendsetters - people who want to make a statement."