It's common for classical musicians to give special performances for people who are unable to attend concerts - residents of nursing homes or small children who can't sit still for long.

It's common for classical musicians to give special performances for people who are unable to attend concerts - residents of nursing homes or small children who can't sit still for long.

But when Korine Fujiwara says her string quartet tries "to bring music to people that can't get out," she also means it literally.

Taking a cue from Johnny Cash, the Carpe Diem String Quartet became the first music group to ever perform at the Franklin County Juvenile Detention Center. Rather than playing potentially off-putting classical music, they featured "The Simpsons" theme song and other relatable compositions.

"They were blown away," Fujiwara said of the reaction to her performance there. "One of the girls said, 'I think that is the nicest thing anyone has ever done.'"

Another concert at the facility is just one of the numerous things the versatile quartet has planned for the next few months. Fujiwara is so busy that she has to regularly check the quartet's website to keep her schedule straight.

So far this winter, the Montana-raised violist - who also plays violin - has been touring the country with the ensemble, which released a CD of her compositions in late November.

The album features a folksy suite inspired by her home state as well as a composition that was commissioned in honor of Charles Darwin's 200th birthday and inspired by a paragraph in his "On the Origin of Species."

Fujiwara said it can be both rewarding and scary to compose for musicians she knows so well.

"Sometimes it's difficult knowing what you're writing for your colleagues and thinking, 'Oh, they're going to hate me!'" she said.

But after playing together for more than 15 years, the other members of the group - Charles Wetherbee, John Ewing and Kristin Ostling - aren't likely to hold a grudge.

The musicians will return home to Columbus after their tour concludes in mid-January, but they won't get much of a break. Carpe Diem will be working with students in local schools, recording a piece by local composer Richard Smoot, performing at local nursing homes, and giving concerts for the public at the Harrison Park Community Center on Jan. 28 and 30.

Meanwhile, Fujiwara will be preparing her newest composition for her collaboration with the Columbus Dance Theatre. That multimedia work, which includes live music, dance and video clips, will premiere Feb. 25.