On both standing screens at the Wexner Center this week, filmmaker Ben Russell will be your travel guide for unusual ventures of mind and body.

On both standing screens at the Wexner Center this week, filmmaker Ben Russell will be your travel guide for unusual ventures of mind and body.

The Box holds the latest in Russell's "Trypps" series of short films through the month of January. And tonight, the filmmaker will visit the Wex to introduce his new feature film, "Let Each One Go Where He May."

Altered perception is part of every cinematic experience. What the viewer sees is manipulated by the filmmaker, and what the filmmaker can capture is limited by the constraints of the image frame and the element of artifice that exists in all film, fiction or not.

Russell puts the medium's manipulations and inadequacies at the forefront of his work, with experimental techniques and a natural sense of the rhythms that capture an audience.

Made with support from the center's film/video studio program, "Trypps #7 (Badlands)" takes a literal approach to the series title, starting with a young woman on LSD in the South Dakota desert.

With a succession of near-deafening gongs, her image begins to shift and give way to the surrounding landscape through the spinning of what the camera's actually shooting - a narrow strip of double-sided mirror in which the woman is reflected. The viewer is reflected in turn by a subtle installation of mirrors within The Box.

The effect hints at a view of what's behind the woman's spacey stare and rapturous smile but delivers only a flat representation of it. A crack in the onscreen mirror punctuates the imperfectness of Russell's effort. Regardless, it's beautifully shot and genuinely hypnotic.

"Let Each One Go Where He May" extends from the "Trypps" series (a segment of the film makes up most of "Trypp #6") and into a rarely seen culture. Following two brothers in Suriname on a long journey for work, Russell counters the passive observation of a field study with the fluid, predetermined choreography of a Steadicam.