Love Culture frontman Tristan Swan explained the difference between the pair of EPs his band is releasing this weekend at Circus.

Love Culture frontman Tristan Swan explained the difference between the pair of EPs his band is releasing this weekend at Circus.

"'Aquamarine,' at least emotionally and atmospherically, I think it's more up in the clouds. It's more of a dreamy, gauzy, fuzzy record," Swan said. "And then 'Drag' is much more in the pavement."

It's like the subtle difference between My Bloody Valentine and The Jesus and Mary Chain, but it's still a difference.

Love Culture began in Maine as a droning acoustic partnership between Swan's brother Raleigh and James Levesque. The pair moved to Columbus in late 2008, living temporarily with Tristan and his girlfriend, Sky Cunningham, in Victorian Village. As a two-week stay extended into months, the four began collaborating.

The new Love Culture combined the original project's haze with strains of glam, emo and new wave, harkening to the late-'80s heyday of shoegaze without merely plundering the past. Their sound wasn't common to Columbus, nor their look, an art-goth swag borrowed from the Smashing Pumpkins and Kill Hannah.

They began playing live by summer 2009, going through two drummers before connecting with current beat-keeper Robert Fischer. These days their seamless, banter-free sets are backed by video montages by VJ Oz, who also produced their EPs.

Love Culture's latest reveals a more immediate, terrestrial side of the band. But just as its sonics remain steeped in a hazy glow, its tales of personal disconnection are only relatively earthbound.

"It's the real world according to Love Culture, or according to me, which happens to be probably nothing close to the real world," Tristan Swan said. "I don't think I could ever write, like, a Hold Steady song."

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