Imagine trying to walk with 55-gallon metal barrels attached to each foot - after nearly an hour and a half of dancing, drumming and running around nonstop.

Imagine trying to walk with 55-gallon metal barrels attached to each foot - after nearly an hour and a half of dancing, drumming and running around nonstop.

"I call 'Stomp' a musical sport," said Elec Simon, a Canton-based former football player and member of the show's touring cast. "'Stomp' is harder than some sports."

The performers are treated like athletes, with weekly massages and nights off to recuperate. "I have a bad shoulder. Everyone has small injuries," Simon said. "But we all love our jobs."

With a background in percussion and tap dance, Simon always aspired to be a member of the "Stomp" cast, which he joined six years ago. Even though most of the show's 12 performers are professional dancers or drummers, Simon says the show's creators can teach almost anyone how to transform a broom or trash can into an instrument. There's even a former mechanic in the cast.

"If they like what they see, they can make you a Stomper," he said.

"Stomp" has been making music out of everyday objects since the show premiered in 1991. On this year's tour, two new routines feature paint cans that get tossed around the stage and tractor tire inner tubes that are played like traditional Japanese taiko drums - the drummers move their entire arms, eliciting tremendous force and drama.

"The show has changed a lot," Simon said. "The creators are trying to challenge us and venture out."

Simon's percussion adventures aren't confined to the show. One of his main interests is using buckets as drums.

"I had to do that to eat," Simon said of his pre-"Stomp" life in New York. "I had to play on the streets, tap dance on the streets. It became a part of my life."

But he and the rest of the "Stomp" cast are always open to finding new instruments.

"If you give me anything - a pile of doughnuts, a can of beans - I'm going to make some music with it," he said.