David E. Kelley, a former Boston lawyer, found immense success creating courtroom dramas like "L.A. Law" and "The Practice," but by far his best work was the quirky dramedy "Ally McBeal."

David E. Kelley, a former Boston lawyer, found immense success creating courtroom dramas like "L.A. Law" and "The Practice," but by far his best work was the quirky dramedy "Ally McBeal."

"McBeal" wasn't groundbreaking, but it had an original tone and a quirky sense of humor. Kelley's new series, "Harry's Law," tries to duplicate that design but fails miserably, resulting in a ridiculously poor take on criminal law.

When Harry (Kathy Bates) is fired from her prominent job as a patent lawyer, she decides to try criminal defense after a ludicrous series of events brings her a partner and first client.

She opens up shop in a former shoe store - where her assistant (Brittany Snow) sells the leftover merchandise - in a bad Cincinnati neighborhood.

The premise is trite, and the courtroom scenes are filled with political grandstanding that's not only irrelevant and unrealistic but worthy of contempt (of court).