I've never been completely enthralled by HBO's "Big Love," but it's always piqued my interest as a strange and revolutionary series - an absurdist soap opera about polygamy and the Mormon lifestyle.

I've never been completely enthralled by HBO's "Big Love," but it's always piqued my interest as a strange and revolutionary series - an absurdist soap opera about polygamy and the Mormon lifestyle.

And I've handled "Big Love" with kid gloves lately because, even though television requires a suspension of disbelief, the actions of the characters have been simply unbelievable.

Now I'm no expert on Mormonism or the fundamentalist practice of polygamy, but I do understand the way characters should react when conflict arises. And the reactions last season on "Big Love" were all wrong.

Setting aside the more preposterous plotlines - incestuous in-vitro fertilization - Season 4 of "Big Love" was still an utter disaster because of the arc involving the main characters, the Henricksons.

Bill's (Bill Paxton) state senatorial bid seemed promising. His quest for power has always been a driving force, and it should've led to the Henricksons being outed as part of "Big Love's" endgame in this fifth and final season.

But in Season 4's finale, Bill professes his polygamist ways to the public after winning the election in a classic WTF moment. Polygamy is illegal, so it should've been a sure end to Bill's political career while completely alienating his family from the rest of the community.

I was left asking, why would Bill do this? The answer given? To make polygamy more accepted. ?!

In the first three episodes of Season 5, this plan fails miserably. His children are attacked at school - which leads to an excellent, crazed moment from Nicki (Chloe Sevigny) - and his wives are forced out of the lives they had outside the family. Obviously, Bill is met with opposition before he can get settled in office.

Last season's ridiculous error is unforgettable, but at least Season 5 gets back to the basics, somewhat, and tries to quickly erase some of last season's mistakes.

We get plenty of infighting between Bill's wives - the best part of the show - which gives Sevigny the chance to shine. We also see that Bill needs these women more than they need him, and now they're starting to realize it.

How this season plays out will ultimately determine how "Big Love" is remembered, and so far there's an equal amount of problems and triumphs. But whatever happens, there's probably not going to be a happy ending for Bill and the Henricksons.