Eating casserole is about as Midwest as knowing how to still look good under 10 layers of clothing. The older I get, the more I see the beloved casserole's appeal: It's easy to make and it produces hearty-enough slop in one baking dish to satisfy multiple hungry stomachs.

Eating casserole is about as Midwest as knowing how to still look good under 10 layers of clothing. The older I get, the more I see the beloved casserole's appeal: It's easy to make and it produces hearty-enough slop in one baking dish to satisfy multiple hungry stomachs.

Surly Girl Saloon is no stranger to providing diners with caloric-heavy modes of comfort (hello, cupcakes toppling in icing). The restaurant's $9 plate of tuna noodle casserole is a heaping pile of creamy, bubbly deliciousness covered in cheddar cheese and french-fried onions.

Press Grill also provides stick-to-your-ribs comfort, serving a green bean casserole with its Thursday night $9.99 special, the Thanksgiving Dinner. The classic dish is plated beside turkey breast, mashed potatoes, dressing, cranberry sauce and gravy.

Eggfast's menu calls its hash brown casserole famous. Potatoes, onions, cheese and a "closely guarded" spice mix are baked golden brown and served as a main dish, side dish or packed into a breakfast burrito.

And you can find the Greek version of casserole, moussaka, at Olive Tree Mediterranean Caf e in Hilliard. For $13 they'll bake you layers of eggplant, zucchini, potato, ground beef and bechamel cream and coat the top with marinara sauce and Parmesan cheese.