We may not ever admit it out loud, but some infomercials are tempting. I put a few of the As Seen on TV beauty products - available at CVS and Walmart - to the test to satiate your curiosity and possibly save you some dough.

We may not ever admit it out loud, but some infomercials are tempting. I put a few of the As Seen on TV beauty products - available at CVS and Walmart - to the test to satiate your curiosity and possibly save you some dough.


Bumpits

I tried to Snookify myself with these plastic hair inserts, and yeah, I felt a bit ridiculous. While the three different sized Bumpits ($10) each formed a perfect bump that stayed in place easily, no matter how much I teased my thin hair it wouldn't cover up all of the little plastic teeth jutting out of the top.

I handed a Bumpit off to a friend with thick hair, and it worked for her without any trouble. Those of us with fine hair will be counting down the minutes until this fad is over. Oh wait. It ended already.


Heel Tastic

As soon as I opened the plastic packaging of the Heel Tastic ($10), my bedroom smelled like an incense shop. That overwhelming mixture of patchouli-like scents is pretty much all you get from Heel Tastic, a roll-on gel that's supposedly "the miracle solution to dry, cracked feet." It didn't soften my feet, but it did make them sticky. I'm not stuck on Heel Tastic.


Smooth Away

The idea is that rather than shaving, you can rub a Smooth Away ($5) pad covered in tiny "crystals" over your dry legs to remove the hair. Shockingly, gentle buffing with the pad did the trick. Too bad there's a reason for those warnings all over the packaging about irritation. I felt like I had a severe sunburn for about half a day.

Honestly, I'm not sure who would buy the Smooth Away for its utility rather than its novelty, but it's probably practical for non-shower situations like hiking or staying in a yurt.


Ped Egg

I'll admit that I had to psych myself up for about half an hour before I tried the Ped Egg ($10). It's essentially an egg-shaped cheese grater that's supposed to make feet softer by rubbing away dead skin and calluses. Yuck. It literally is like grating your own foot.

But once I gave it a shot, I realized that it essentially does what it promises. Afterward, my feet were slightly softer than before, and the rough spots were a little less rough. But come on now. Unless you're a fetishist, is shredding the skin on your feet really worth it?