On the walls of First Unitarian Universalist Church, hanging where you typically see Stations of the Cross paintings or secular stained glass, there are instead illustrations of a decaying President Nixon and Uncle Ben strapped in machine gun ammunition.

On the walls of First Unitarian Universalist Church, hanging where you typically see Stations of the Cross paintings or secular stained glass, there are instead illustrations of a decaying President Nixon and Uncle Ben strapped in machine gun ammunition.

The images are a part of the progressive church's exhibit of underground press newspaper covers produced during the 1960s and '70s.

They narrate social movements from that turbulent time - women's liberation, Vietnam anti-war protests, African-American and Latino rights. One cover touts a "Special Leninism Supplement" inside.

"These are important historical and cultural parts of our history. We tend to forget what happened," said Don Rice, a graphic designer who started collecting the newspapers in the '70s when he published Schism, the Reader's Digest of the alternative press.

Radical anger and the struggle for justice and equality seethe from the covers through their glass casings, but the newsprints are important pieces of graphic art history, too.

Around this time period, new offset printing let anyone with Scotch tape and a typewriter make a newspaper. Ideas and theories passed through the publications, as did artistic endeavors.

"Up until the underground press, newspapers were pretty staid, gray things," Rice said. "I remember when a friend called saying that The New York Times was going to print something in color. The underground press had been doing these things for some time."

Political cartoons, color photo illustrations and the layout of today's alternative newspapers have all been influenced by this underground press, Rice said.