First published a few years shy of two centuries ago, Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" has been resurrected dozens of times on film. Starting in 1910, directors from Thomas Edison to James Whale, Andy Warhol and Mel Brooks have had a turn.

First published a few years shy of two centuries ago, Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" has been resurrected dozens of times on film. Starting in 1910, directors from Thomas Edison to James Whale, Andy Warhol and Mel Brooks have had a turn.

The new screen adaptation, coming to Columbus via Jazz Arts Group's Inside Track series, presents a remarkable combination of cinema's history and methods that are both contemporary and in keeping with the antique source material.

"Spark of Being," a collaboration between composer and trumpeter Dave Douglas and filmmaker Bill Morrison, will unspool twice: tonight with a pre-recorded soundtrack at Gateway Film Center and Saturday at the Lincoln Theatre with live accompaniment from Douglas' sextet, Keystone.

Douglas brings a progressively democratic approach to jazz. He's covered Rufus Wainwright and Mary J. Blige, and fronted a variety of groups to explore influences from Thom Yorke to international folk music. Keystone was formed to create soundtracks for the films of scandal-plagued silent-era comedian Fatty Arbuckle.

Morrison explores the aesthetic possibilities of decay, using the spots and cracks in highly unstable nitrate film archives as design elements in a series of experimental collages. Composers who have sought his partnership in the past include Bill Frisell and Vijay Iyer.

Shelley's idea of new creations from the cut and stitched remains of pre-existing material is once again the rage in creative circles, and the days seem to be numbered for Morrison's primary media, film emulsion. As such, the timing of this seems just right.

Through title cards and a mix of footage, Morrison encapsulates the essence of Shelley's tale - rushing blood cells, electric arcs rising like fire, the staring eyes of a wary crowd. Throughout, signs of decomposition snatch at the corners of the frame or bubble across the center of the image.

Keystone lays over this a soundtrack that responds to the monster's sensory experience, an overload of sounds and tempos. Tenor sax rolls across the foundation of Douglas' trumpet line and drums racket up the tension, while sonic spaces in between are filled with vinyl scratches, digital skips, electronic breathing and cries of "Mommy."

The work is more faithful to Shelley's original story than the most popular film versions and also more empathetic toward the creature. Though more adaptations are sure to come (Guillermo Del Toro is reportedly up next), none are likely to be true to her work so originally.