Among the outsider artists whose work hangs in the back room at Lindsay Gallery is Stoney St. Clair, a legendary creator of tattoos whose final home was in Columbus.

Among the outsider artists whose work hangs in the back room at Lindsay Gallery is Stoney St. Clair, a legendary creator of tattoos whose final home was in Columbus.

This month Lindsay turns its exhibition space over to some of Stoney's occupational descendants, more than a dozen tattoo artists and piercers from Evolved's body art studios near Campus. The group took the opportunity of getting away from commission work and human skin to explore designs and thoughts of individual interest.

Piercer Lindsay Hearts presented a fashion-themed performance at the show's rowdy Gallery Hop opening, taking donated T-shirts and turning them into one-of-a-kind pieces by cutting and tying the fabric on the women who'd take them home. (There's video of the artist at work at lindsayhearts.com.)

Lars Johansson, a local art and tattooing veteran, brings the smooth, strong lines of his trade to a pair of Asian carp, but here he gets to do something he can't do at work - experiment with surface texture.

A friend of the Evolved team, Craig Fisher from Toledo's Ibis Press Studio, contributes surrealistic intaglio prints with an accomplished, organic creepiness. Piercer Sarvas Berry shares his interest in Asian art with the haunted "Ghost Lantern."

The traditional form for tattoo artists' work - flash art - is represented by work from several artists, including Sarah Blinkhorn and Lauren Busiere. Each has a personal agenda behind her approach.

Blinkhorn aims to bring new life and meaning to American tribal designs. From her forms emerge Ohio-indigenous foliage, black birds, skulls and stocking-clad legs.

"I like the idea of a mandala, a shape you can meditate on, but with a modern swing to it," she explained.

Busiere betrays her traditional approach to tattoo art in clean renderings of women who'd look right at home on the nose of a WWII bomber.

"If you're going to have something on your body for 60 years, it better be timeless," she said.