The cover of Interpol's self-titled fourth album pictures the band's logo being shattered to bits, or possibly reassembling in some sort of reverse big bang.

The cover of Interpol's self-titled fourth album pictures the band's logo being shattered to bits, or possibly reassembling in some sort of reverse big bang.

That's exactly what the suave post-punk veterans went through in order to keep functioning, and it's why drummer Sam Fogarino called from Athens, Georgia, last month rather than the city they'll always be inextricably linked with, New York.

"I mainly live here [in Athens]. I'm only in New York when we are rehearsing and writing and recording these days," Fogarino said. "I like trees. I had many years of concrete."

Fogarino's move south was one of the ways Interpol's members dealt with the exhaustion that plagued 2007 LP "Our Love to Admire." After 2002 debut "Turn On the Bright Lights" made them instant rock stars and 2004's "Antics" kept them in the limelight, they trudged into the studio fresh off four straight years of touring. "Fresh" wasn't the operative word, though.

"There wasn't long enough to reflect on what had just happened, and I think we were all really tired, just mentally exhausted and kind of tired of being around each other so much," Fogarino said. "At the end of it all, I think compositionally the record's pretty strong. But I think there is a lot of tension without release that is captured on that record."

After touring for "Our Love To Admire," they went their separate ways for a while, only to reconvene rejuvenated in January 2009.

The resulting record revives all the Interpol essentials, from guitarist Daniel Kessler's acute angles to Paul Banks' trademark lyrical absurdities ("Please police me! I want you to police me, but keep it clean!").

Though bassist Carlos D left the band after those recording sessions, his gloomy rumble is present on the album. He's been replaced for touring purposes by underground rock journeyman and sometimes Columbus resident David Pajo. Secret Machines' Brandon Curtis is playing keyboards too.

Interpol's renewed vigor trickled over to their Columbus fan base, who sold out Newport Music Hall so fast that Sunday's show has been moved to the roomier LC Pavilion. As elder statesmen, they're attracting just as healthy a draw as when they were the next big thing.

"I'm still surprised we're a band, let alone on our fourth record," Fogarino said. "It's a volatile endeavor. And we managed to stick it out."