Let's discuss the turmoil in Egypt by first looking at how the U.S. government reacted to the situation. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton originally said the Egyptian government was "stable." Her tune changed slightly after the first few days of protests.

Let's discuss the turmoil in Egypt by first looking at how the U.S. government reacted to the situation. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton originally said the Egyptian government was "stable." Her tune changed slightly after the first few days of protests.

"We want to see an orderly transition to a democratic government exactly what the protesters are seeking," Clinton said on Jan. 30.

So by "stable," she must have meant "leaving." She made a quicker turnaround than a Mets fan at a Phillies game.

Well, after six days of protests, President Hosni Mubarak finally took to the airwaves Tuesday night last week.

"I was never, ever interested in being a dictator," he said.

I just knew as a child that I wanted to oppress people, but I never thought I would get this far. I though t maybe I could be some kind of dickish assistant manager that nobody likes or an unreasonably strict teacher, but to be here screwing over all you people is just a dream come true.

The big question was really if Mubarak is staying or going.

"I tell you honestly and regardless of the current circumstances that I didn't intend to run for a new presidential term because I've spent enough time in my life serving Egypt and its people," Mubarak said.

Egypt, you can't fire me - because I quit. You'r e a bunch of stupid-heads .

But the takeaway is at least he's leaving. The people have been heard, and they can go back to their normal lives. Let the new Mubarak-less cabinet begin the democratic reform process.

"I will continue to supervise the new government," Mubarak said.

OK, apparently Mubarak hasn't seen this movie. This is not the part where you stay - it's the part where you take a bunch of gold bricks, and maybe some priceless artifacts, and hop on a plane to Dubai. Needless to say, the Egyptian people did not respond well to this news.

"You now have people on the front lines of both sides throwing rocks and bottles," reported CNN's Anderson Cooper.

The situation grew worse later in the night as instances of gunfire and incendiary devices were being reported. Then pro-Mubarak forces were shown stampeding and attacking the anti-Mubarak protesters on camel and horseback.

I couldn't help but notice that the "pro-Mubarak" demonstrators seemed to be slightly more organized - and armed. What a spontaneous eruption of pro-Mubarak sentiment from everyday Egyptians trained in the art of whip-based crowd control.

I didn't like where it was going, but I never thought it would take a turn for the worst possible outcome - assault on Anderson Cooper.

"We were set upon by pro-Mubarak supporters who were punching us in the head," Cooper said. "The crowd kept growing, kept throwing more punches and kicks suddenly a young man would come up, look at you and then punch you in right in the face."

All right, Hosni, now you've gone too far! Hands off Anderson Cooper! There's not to be a silvery wisp out of place on that man's glorious head.