For years, the people guiding Downtown redevelopment have maintained that business follows people. If you get a group to live and work in the central city, things like restaurants, bars and grocery stores will start to show.

For years, the people guiding Downtown redevelopment have maintained that business follows people. If you get a group to live and work in the central city, things like restaurants, bars and grocery stores will start to show.

In a good neighborhood, they argue, neighbors come first.

The most recent evidence in their ongoing case is The Quarthouse Bar & Grill, which on Monday opened for lunch, happy hour and dinner at the corner of South Front and West Main streets. It stands in the shadow of the new Franklin County Courthouse and scant blocks from the RiverSouth housing units, where the paint's still wet.

"It's probably going to take longer than anticipated, but [the neighborhood] is coming," said co-owner Adrian Rosu, who also runs historic Ringside Cafe. "With the courthouse right there, people are coming in. There's not much competition down here."

Neighborhood action was one reason behind the new venture by Rosu and Sam Shalash, owner of C-Town Market and Deli. In other ways, the restaurant just made sense: Rosu wanted to try something new, and Shalash had been sitting on the space adjacent to his nightclub.

There's a door that leads back to The Mansion - which hosts dance parties and national DJs - but The Quarthouse offers a distinct after-work vibe and far quieter confines.

Tucked inside a rather uninviting exterior, the main space is tasteful and chic, with a palette heavy on black and deep reddish brown. Flat-screen TVs, metallic track lighting and vintage scoop chairs adorn a bar that combines elements of downtown lounge, neighborhood lunch spot and upscale sports pub.

The rest of the operation treads among these three approaches, though at times it seems a bit unsure about what it wants to be.

The Quarthouse is definitely a place to dine as well as drink, and much of the menu mirrors the Ringside's emphasis on cooked-to-order hamburgers, sandwiches and wraps, which range from $8 to $13.

If you're looking for a great happy-hour amenity, try the delicious 25-cent wings offered 4-7 p.m. weekdays. And if you've just finished a triathlon, try the Executioner ($19), a bi-patty behemoth with ham, bacon, cheddar, blue cheese, onion rings and other trimmings.

The Quarthouse likely will hone its vision once it settles in. For now, expect to see Downtown's nine-to-fivers and its new residents checking in for happy hour and a change of pace come dinnertime.