Sam Amidon grew up in Vermont listening to his parents sing ancient folk songs. Now he does it, too, in a mode completely his own. For four albums now Amidon has been reworking the public domain's dusty artifacts (and R. Kelly) into soothing and stimulating newfangled folk, posting up at the intersection of then and now like Nick Drake reincarnated as a tech-savvy ingenue.

Sam Amidon grew up in Vermont listening to his parents sing ancient folk songs. Now he does it, too, in a mode completely his own. For four albums now Amidon has been reworking the public domain's dusty artifacts (and R. Kelly) into soothing and stimulating newfangled folk, posting up at the intersection of then and now like Nick Drake reincarnated as a tech-savvy ingenue.

Local unsung hero Brian Harnetty, who'll open Friday's Wexner Center show, offers a different method of reframing the past, mining the Appalachian sonic archives at Berea College for the building blocks of his serene sample-based compositions.