The textured artwork of John Donnelly is found in private collections in Europe and Japan, but recent customers of Max the Salon Short North got to examine Donnelly paintings hanging behind a foil-hair-wrapped woman sitting beneath a blow dryer and flipping through Redbook.

The textured artwork of John Donnelly is found in private collections in Europe and Japan, but recent customers of Max the Salon Short North got to examine Donnelly paintings hanging behind a foil-hair-wrapped woman sitting beneath a blow dryer and flipping through Redbook.

Collectors don't have to head to galleries to find pieces for sale - plenty of art can be found in unexpected places, like coffee shops, sandwich spots and tattoo parlors. It's a trend that benefits more than just art seekers unsatisfied by gallery or museum shop options.

"Clients love it because they're exposed to something new. I love it because it gives me new looks to put on the walls. Artists love it because they get exposure," said salon director Chantel Polascak of the art for sale at Max the Salon.

Wanting to have more of a presence during the district's monthly Gallery Hops, Polascak began curating canvases alongside conditioners.

Today at Max, shoppers will find textured paintings from Annette Poitau and Donnelly, an Ohio artist who draws striking charcoal portraits and paints colorful pieces that have some visual reference to Tinkerbell hidden in their abstract busyness. Poitau and Donnelly are both represented by Marcia Evans Gallery, which coordinated the exhibit at the salon. The pieces range from $75 to $3,800.

"A lot of clients will come back later and buy a piece," Polascak said, but anyone can stop in and make an art purchase.

Polascak regularly rotates in new artists, sending the Short North's selections for a second stop at Max's German Village location. The salon has sold everything from edgy metal sculptures to pop-art portraits of celebrities like Slash and Bill Clinton.

More offbeat options

Rumba Caf e (2507 Summit St.) sells contemporary work by Cloudhaus, a local artist collective. The paintings are auctioned off the bar's walls at bids ranging from $100 to $1,200.

In addition to its coffee, cocktail, record and book inventory, Kafe Kerouac (2250 N. High St.) sells its decor. Currently up for grabs are works from Nix Comics Quarterly.

Clintonville coffee shop Yeah, Me Too (3005 Indianola Ave.) sells art made by adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities from advocate group Arc of Ohio. Right now the space is filled with giant panels of colored self portraits, but the shop typically sells Arc students' paintings for $50 and $60. All the sales go straight to the individual creator.

The guys at Short North Tattoo (1042 N. High St.) sell some of their fine art, which is on view in the shop's permanent gallery space. Artists featured in guest exhibits will occasionally have pieces for sale.

Restaurants are rife with art for sale. Find frequently refreshed lineups of painting and photography at the new Spinelli's Deli Downtown location (50 N. High St.), local artist Andy Ball's re-purposed metal sculptures at Old Mohawk (819 Mohawk St.), and nature-inspired sculptures and prints at Black Creek Bistro (51 Parsons Ave.).