Traditionally, the Sabbath is a day of rest, but David Sabbath has been working 20-hour days to complete his debut feature film, "God Don't Make the Laws." After weeks of obsessive editing, he finished the first cut last week.

Traditionally, the Sabbath is a day of rest, but David Sabbath has been working 20-hour days to complete his debut feature film, "God Don't Make the Laws." After weeks of obsessive editing, he finished the first cut last week.

It's not that Sabbath is in crunch time. In fact, he's six weeks ahead of schedule. The Columbus filmmaker is simply too psyched to wait.

Sabbath makes a fine living producing commercials through his company, Three Dog Films. Still, for years he's been itching to make the plunge into features.

It's a common aspiration, but relatively few upstart directors manage to recruit Hollywood actors like Paul Sorvino ("Goodfellas"), Robert Prescott ("Michael Clayton") and Bruce Davison ("X-Men"). Sabbath cast those names alongside local talent like Tiffany Arnold and Jason Crabtree plus a bastion of young TV actors he scouted out in New York.

They and an Ohio-based crew joined forces in German Village and Granville this past December to bring to life Sabbath's story of Rockwell, a fictional American town where no one ages as long as folks maintain the status quo.

"The movie's if Stephen King was writing on the back of a Norman Rockwell postcard," Sabbath said.

"God Don't Make the Laws" is one of "seven or eight" scripts Sabbath has penned over the years. He chose to make this one first because it was affordable and accessible.

"It's about small-town America. It's about basketball. It's about hope. It's about exclusion, inclusion, aging. I mean, it's stuff we all deal with," Sabbath said. "Outside of the F-bombs, Disney could pick this up. And you could easily drop those."

The plan is to finish the final cut by May, hold a private New York screening for the talent in June and spend the rest of the year entering the movie in European film festivals. Sabbath is holding off on North American fests for now so he doesn't ruin his chances for Sundance next January.

Beyond that, Sabbath is already dusting off those other scripts: "I'll be making another one by next May."