Broad Street Bagels & Deli sits in a building that's adjacent to the Alive office. It's so close, we just refer to it as "downstairs." Like, "Where'd you get that delicious looking sandwich?" "Downstairs."

Broad Street Bagels & Deli sits in a building that's adjacent to the Alive office. It's so close, we just refer to it as "downstairs." Like, "Where'd you get that delicious looking sandwich?" "Downstairs."

Sure, the Capitol Square spot's proximity is part of its appeal, but the sandwiches, wraps and salads are tasty enough - and the service is fast and friendly enough - that I'd be a regular customer even if I couldn't sneak in for a coffee in the pouring rain sans umbrella, or run over for lunch in January without having to pile on the coat-hat-gloves-scarves combo.

Like at a lot of Downtown lunch joints, the line is sometimes long here, but the experienced staff moves customers quickly through the order-at-the-counter, sandwich-assembly-line setup. Choose-your-own-ingredient salads are made at a separate counter.

Even with many customers placing to-go orders, a small group of tables is nearly always full during lunch rush.

And at any time of day - well, at least between their 6:45 a.m.-2:30 p.m. hours of operation - locally sourced Stauf's coffee is a popular alternative in a part of town dominated by Starbucks and Dunkin' Donuts.

The Soho, $5.99

This bagel deli stocks good bagels, of course (popular varieties are often sold out by 1), and you can turn any sandwich on the menu into a bagel sandwich. I like the idea of bagel sandwiches, but unless they're steamed (RIP Beekman's Bagel Deli), I find them a little unwieldy to eat.

So I usually stick to slathering the excellent bagels with cream cheese and ordering sandwiches that come on eggy challah rolls. The baked-fresh rolls are alwayssoft and hearty, but not so bready that you're full after half the meal.

A favorite is the Soho. It starts with a nice pile of memorable roast beef. Rather than your standard cardboard-brown and cardboard-dry cold cut, these thick slices are slightly pink, like they're freshly carved from an actual roast.

Next is several pieces of nice gouda, a welcome step up from the usual American or provolone options. A cream-cheesy herb spread and creamy horseradish sauce, that pungent and perfect roast beef accompaniment, add lots more flavor. Mixed greens, a few tomato slices and some red onions round out this excellent entree.

All orders come with some of Broad Street's addicting spicy flat bread chips in plastic sandwich baggies, just like Mom would pack in your lunch.

If you're in the mood for dessert, a tray near the cash register is filled with baked goods like brownies, cookies and muffins. The fudge-iced brownies are almost as good as homemade.

Soho sandwich: $5.99

Brownie: $1.25

Tax: .48

Total: $7.72