Unlike the practices of self-promoting citizens and fly-by-night businesses, I believe restaurants mostly use their superpowers of tweeting for good. And with so many eateries tweeting about their seasonal dishes, nightly specials and other various semi-newsworthy goings on these days, I decided to coin a term to describe them: Twitter-rants.

Unlike the practices of self-promoting citizens and fly-by-night businesses, I believe restaurants mostly use their superpowers of tweeting for good. And with so many eateries tweeting about their seasonal dishes, nightly specials and other various semi-newsworthy goings on these days, I decided to coin a term to describe them: Twitter-rants.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not knocking the 140-character thumbnail-sketching of menu specials in the least, in fact I thoroughly appreciate being alerted to what's out there before I target a place for noshing.

One Twitter-rant that considerately and consistently keeps followers up to speed on its ever-changing cuisine is the excellent Black Creek Bistro. Lured in by their good-reading specials, I recently popped in to catch up.

Libation wise, BCB is currently playing around with some fun house-infused hooches, and you can score one of their flavor-flaunting cocktails for a mere $5 during happy hour (4-7 p.m. Monday-Friday).

Among these, I would recommend the molar-melting pineapple and habanero tequila only to thrill jockeys, and I'd say the watermelon vodka cosmo would be great for people not afraid of a fruity, pink yet utterly refreshing drink.

If you're going for wine, though, you're also in luck - big luck - because BCB sells its good vinos for really cheap. In fact, every week it spotlights some whites and reds sold at retail prices (I suggest you enjoy these with BCB's tart, herby, flat-out delicious, served-warm olives).

For more substantial and autumnal-oriented fare, BCB's recent menu addition of Chicken & Dumplings ($18) was a crowd pleaser if a bit of a misnomer. See, the "Creole dumplings" were more like puffy domes of seasoned spoonbread, and the dish - which featured lots of tender pulled chicken, herbs, carrots and mushrooms in a very chickeny gravy -ate like a deconstructed pot pie.

Another winning entree I tried that is likely to pop up again as a special - if not actually make its way onto the seasonal menu - was Venison Stew ($16). Rosemary and wine deeply scented mushrooms and lean, beefy-tasting and not at all stringy or gamey dark chunks of deer meat. Also on the plate were not-long-out-of-the-ground carrots and radishes from nearby Sunny Meadows Farms and a really great potato gratin.

I plan on trying some more of BCB's specials - like from their Monday-through-Thursday $10 bistro entrees - as soon as a little bird tells me about them.