Laura Jones lovingly calls her family "a little ADD." In the past two year, she and her kids Jerrod, Israel and Addison have opened four retail shops.

Laura Jones lovingly calls her family "a little ADD." In the past two year, she and her kids Jerrod, Israel and Addison have opened four retail shops.

The Joneses were behind the popular but short-lived stores Nest at Easton and Shine at Polaris. They've closed those two locations and combined them into The Swanky Abode.

"Running two stores was hard," Laura said, especially in different parts of town, "and this space opened up and we wanted to move here."

That space is the 7,000-square-foot store across from Anthropologie at Easton, where Z Gallerie used to be. Before that it was the Joneses' Christmas pop-up shop Glad Tidings.

The sprawling location showcases the eclectic mix of products available at The Swanky Abode. Sectioned off areas present different styles of decor based on the siblings' expertise.

Toward the front is Jerrod's space, with dark industrial and vintage pieces such as old sewing machines, a 1950s typewriter and colored glass milk bottles. Israel's area near the back of the store is filled with high-end furniture and art - an Eames lounge chair here, a Robert Chase painting there.

Addison brought in jewelry and stationery by Columbus designers such as Daisy Mae and DFMI designs, as well as recycled jewelry, owl pendant necklaces and accessories made with enameled butterfly wings.

An open studio in the back lets customers watch the family paint products or sew indie-patterned pillows.

The variety of items makes The Swanky Abode unique, Jerrod said - from the hydroponic plants to books like "Porn for New Moms" (pictures of hot dads doing diapers and doling out compliments).

"We had a family in just the other day, ages 18 to 55, and each one of them found something they really wanted to buy," he said. "They told us that meant a lot to them."

"And that meant a lot to us," Israel added.

Also worth mentioning is the family's connection to a local graffiti artist, who will paint furniture brought in by customers. A kitchen table bearing his work is currently for sale in the store for $499.

"Everything in here has a story," Israel said. "It's really cool."