Scott Goss, a glass artist from Cleveland, studies "industrial, forgotten parts of Midwest cities" and then translates their stories into pieces of art.

Scott Goss, a glass artist from Cleveland, studies "industrial, forgotten parts of Midwest cities" and then translates their stories into pieces of art.

Scenes from cities like Cleveland, Columbus, Chicago and Pittsburgh are engraved on a sheet of glass with a skyline. The drawing is then painted and layered onto a piece of copper.

Bridges and power lines "add a gritty feel," Goss said. The texture of the glass echoes patterns seen in urban settings, like those on manholes or metal grates.

The contrast of the solid color in the background and the manmade structures in front is a visual cue of what Goss wants viewers to consider. How do buildings blend in to the story of a city, and what happens to them when the plot changes?

"There's a hidden beauty to these places," Goss said. "I want people to recognize the entire landscape."

Stop by Brandt-Roberts Galleries during Gallery Hop to see selections from Goss' series of cities, as well as oil paintings from Sally Tharp.

Tharp also finds inspiration in forgotten scenes. Her oil-on-canvas takes of everyday, discarded objects such as marbles, toy trucks and glass canning jars point to the tarnished beauty and imperfections of lost things with all the realism of a photograph.


Rivet Gallery

Rivet's May show is a round-up of four illustration artists worth knowing. Joe Scarano's work hearkens to the days of early animation with paintings of friendly seeming little guys who harbor empty eyes and plenty of bad habits. Jason Snyder's female subjects are mysterious and alluring, and Roland Tamayo's work fuses manmade objects with nature. Paul Barnes uses warm palettes and mythical subject matter to induce the hazy scenes of remembering a dream.


Lindsay Gallery

Artist Bill Miller repurposes linoleum and vinyl flooring to create detailed scenes loaded with color and texture. His art can be at once familiar and startling, as in the work "John John," a re-creation of the famous image of John F. Kennedy Jr. as a child saluting his father's casket, but this time he's standing in a puddle of blood.