The demands of undergrad can be all-consuming. But for Daykeyla McGee, they couldn't be. McGee came to college four months pregnant and, with the help of her mother, juggled studying with raising her son, Rayshawn.

The demands of undergrad can be all-consuming. But for Daykeyla McGee, they couldn't be. McGee came to college four months pregnant and, with the help of her mother, juggled studying with raising her son, Rayshawn.

She never questioned her choice to get a design degree.

"I always needed an artistic form of expressing myself," she said.

In fifth grade, McGee made her first look book. She sketched dresses and outfits, colored each design and made them into a catalogue (which an aunt laminated for her). She even assigned the outfits prices.

McGee's senior collection is made for women who have plenty of curves and are proud of it.

"There's a beauty of a woman's natural body," she said of wanting to buck the trend of pin-thin fashion models. "I want to accentuate it, for my designs to be sexy to the woman's curve."

She followed her muse's appreciation for hourglass figures in her patterns and added her own touch with things like zippered detailing and a cropped leather jacket perfect for a night on the town.

McGee said she's more than ready for graduation, too, having already selected the pint-size zoot suit Rayshawn will wear while watching his mom get her diploma.

Azzedine Alaia (1980s)

Worshippers of Alaia's work included Naomi Campbell, Grace Jones and Raquel Welch. The "King of Cling" - as Alaia was nicknamed - kicked these stars' already insane curves into overdrive. His dresses were elegant and edgy, sexy without skank.

After a crazy successful decade, the designer hibernated throughout the '90s. But his legacy was set, and he even was namedropped in a cheesy cinematic classic (a true marker of success in America if ever there was one): Remember that slinky red number Alicia Silverstone wears when she gets robbed at gunpoint in "Clueless"? Totally an Alaia.