This month, visitors to the Columbus Metropolitan Library can check out the latest novels and see the Ohio Art League's 100th annual Spring Juried Exhibition, a collection of 78 pieces by Ohio-based artists, in one trip.

This month, visitors to the Columbus Metropolitan Library can check out the latest novels and see the Ohio Art League's 100th annual Spring Juried Exhibition, a collection of 78 pieces by Ohio-based artists, in one trip.

"It's almost an unexpected space," said Eliza Jones, gallery director and organizational administrator for the Ohio Art League. "Having it at the library is great because we open it up to an audience that might not otherwise get to see these shows or be aware of them."

In recent years the art league has held the show at OSU Urban Arts Space and Shot Tower Gallery, but it decided to return to the library for the centennial exhibition.

"Some of our original shows were held there," Jones explained. "We were trying to tie that history together."

OSU art professor Todd Slaughter, whose blue "Mortarboard" sculpture hangs over Rich Street near Franklin University, juried this year's exhibition, which is in the Carnegie Gallery and part of the library's second floor.

Paintings, sculptures and photographs line the gallery and the hallway leading to it.

The muted colors in Michael May's "Curing the Common Cold" make the work stand out from the vibrant paintings inside the gallery.

May offers an explanation of "how to catch a sneeze," and the painted canvas is segmented into boxes showing each of the tools and steps in the process. The tools include twists of paper, Mason jars and a green glass bottle. Steps labeled "Catch," "Kill" and "Enjoy" yield an unappealing brown liquid covering burnt paper - and ostensibly, the invisible sneeze - in a Mason jar that's garnished with lime.

Across the library, near the DVD section, white panels hanging from the ceiling serve as temporary gallery walls.

Jeremy Stone's "You Already See in 3D (It's Called Stereopsis)" greets visitors near the front of the exhibit space. The light brown serigraph shows the inside of a movie theater. Projections emitted from the rows of seats form the words "You," "already," "see," "in" and "3D," poking fun at America's current fascination with 3D films when reality always exists in three dimensions.

I'm guessing Stone didn't rush out to see "Drive Angry 3D."