A guy practicing parkour basically looks like an action-movie stuntman. He might scale a wall, leap off a building and then run straight at a park bench only to jump over it. Parkour, which started in Paris in the late '90s, is an art form - hence its other name, "l'art du deplacement," or "the art of movement." The idea is to swiftly navigate past obstacles.

A guy practicing parkour basically looks like an action-movie stuntman. He might scale a wall, leap off a building and then run straight at a park bench only to jump over it. Parkour, which started in Paris in the late '90s, is an art form - hence its other name, "l'art du deplacement," or "the art of movement." The idea is to swiftly navigate past obstacles.

Two of the sport's founders, Yann Hnautra and Chau Belle Dinh, will join nine other parkour experts from Paris and London to lead workshops at Hocking Hills this Saturday and Battelle Riverfront Park on Sunday and Monday. Anyone can sign up for the workshop or stop by the park on Sunday or Monday to watch.

"I couldn't imagine a better way to start than training with these guys," said Nick Kelly, co-director of local group Parkour Horizons. "These guys started it and really helped develop it."