When it comes to art, size matters. A viewer's response to a large work can be much more visceral than to a small one, depending on the subject matter and artist's intent.

When it comes to art, size matters. A viewer's response to a large work can be much more visceral than to a small one, depending on the subject matter and artist's intent.

Barbara Mink's abstract paintings, on display beginning this weekend at Marcia Evans Gallery, range from 2-foot-by-2-foot squares to mammoth 5-foot-long pieces.

"I think scale is very important," said Mink, who teaches communication management at Cornell University. "Confronting a large canvas with a lot going on in it can be very exciting, almost like interacting with a peer."

This exhibition includes selections from several series Mink painted in 2009 and 2010. The 2009 works, featuring black curlicues and spots of color, play with principles from physics,astronomy and mathematics. In 2010, Mink tended to focus on color fields.

Mink acknowledged that some people might feel intimidated by abstract art, and she said there's no specific approach needed to understand her work.

"I find that letting yourself respond in whatever way comes naturally is the best, without trying to figure out what you should be feeling," she said. "Most people like the energy and color in my work. Some people see the stars; others see subatomic movement; others see music. What's so wonderful to me is when people feel that a painting speaks to them; it doesn't matter what the language is."

Comics and Cans

A new local comics group called the Columbus Comics Creator Coalition, or C-4, will hold its first event Saturday night at What the Rock?!

The brainchild of James Moore of Two Headed Monster Comics, Katie Baadke of Next Year's Girl, Ken Eppstein of Nix Comics Quarterly and Christian Hoffer-Christian of The Outhouse, C-4 aims to help the public appreciate Columbus' comics scene and to integrate the medium into the city's arts community.

On Saturday six artists' work will be on display in the store, and five individuals will create art live during Comics and Cans, an event benefitting the Mid-Ohio Food Pantry. Visitors who win the raffle - tickets will be available for $1 or in exchange for cans of food - will take home original art or comic books.

The art will be on display through the end of June.