Darlene Yeager-Torre, a former art teacher, spent most of her life as a painter. When she was in her 40s, though, her Tourette's syndrome came out of remission and caused her painting arm to shake. She had to give up the art form, a devastating change for a creative spirit.

Darlene Yeager-Torre, a former art teacher, spent most of her life as a painter. When she was in her 40s, though, her Tourette's syndrome came out of remission and caused her painting arm to shake. She had to give up the art form, a devastating change for a creative spirit.

"What am I going to do to satisfy my creativity?" she said she asked herself. "I thought, if I put a camera on a tripod, it doesn't shake. And that's why I do photography."

She teamed up with artist Paula Hardin, who had to stop painting because of multiple sclerosis symptoms, to take up night photography. The two use a method called painting with light, which gives them the freedom to move around unencumbered by a camera.

"[The change in medium] is because I have this disability," Yeager-Torre said, "but I don't consider it a disability because it directed me to where I am now."

Yeager-Torre begins her process with a black canvas rather than a blank one.

Cloaked in black so that she will appear invisible to her digital SLR's sensor, she sets up a scene in her basement studio - flowers, a book, sliced fruit. She turns off the lights and uses a remote control to activate her camera, which is set to take a long exposure. A flashlight serves as her paintbrush, and she sneaks quickly around the room, tracing objects that she wants to appear in the photo. A few minutes later, she'll close the camera's shutter, ending the photo.

In one scene, she briefly shines a light behind a rocks glass filled with Coke, illuminating the beverage in a way that suggests a time when people drank by candlelight. In another, a bouquet of flowers seems to glow thanks to her efforts to slide a book light into each bud without touching anything, which would cause a blur.

Yeager-Torre's "Painting with Light" exhibition, curated by Hardin, also features works created outdoors at her brother's farm.

After dark, she ventures into the corn fields and uses different beams - everything from standard Tungsten torches to car lights - to evoke a sense of depth among the stalks. Some parts of the photo she intentionally leaves dark.

"The shadows are so important," she explained. "Usually what I decide to leave in the shadows is as important as what I decide to paint."

Each shot can take as long as 30 minutes, and then she has to wait another half-hour for the information to read to her memory card.

"It's very time consuming," Yeager-Torre said. "But you need the time to run around and paint everything."