Miranda Sound was one of the hardest working bands in Columbus. The indie rockers practiced twice a week, turned an exacting microscope on their songwriting, toured relentlessly and exerted themselves to sweaty exhaustion at every concert.

Miranda Sound was one of the hardest working bands in Columbus. The indie rockers practiced twice a week, turned an exacting microscope on their songwriting, toured relentlessly and exerted themselves to sweaty exhaustion at every concert.

So when Miranda Sound broke up in 2008, the members were ready to relax. Enter Bicentennial Bear.

With drummer Dan Bell busy doing dentistry and multi-instrumentalist Dan Gerken away at law school, Billy Peake and Sean Sefcik convened with ex-Miranda Sound drummer Scott Haynes and band pal Adam Dowell to drink beers and rock weekly. They added Peake's co-worker Leah Wahlin on violin to spice up their well-worn guitar pop sound.

"It was the missing piece we didn't realize we were missing," Peake said.

Since then they've been in a comfortable groove. Now, after almost three years, debut album "Lost Summers" will be released Friday at Kobo.

Chalk up the leisurely pace to the limitations of day jobs, marriages and the stuff of thirtysomething life.

"We're all realistic that we can't go to Texas in July and have the van explode," Peake said.

Thus, they spend most of the album making sense of an inevitable changing of seasons. Consider the mantra from "Cardinal Codes": "He's coming home and he's tired/ He wants to lie down/ He wants to grow old/ Next to the girl that he loves."

"Lost Summers" holds its own against Miranda Sound's catalog. The sense of breathless urgency is absent, but Peake's knack for melody and memorable turns of phrase remains intact. These are easygoing anthems from musicians who know each other well.

The thrill of creation does have Bicentennial Bear nudging the accelerator ever so slightly, though.

"After we put together the record," Peake said, "I was like 'Let's make another one soon.'"