Last weekend, for the first time in years, the blue-and-white sign on the old brick facade was telling the truth: Long Street Live.

Last weekend, for the first time in years, the blue-and-white sign on the old brick facade was telling the truth: Long Street Live.

Long Street District, a sprawling nightlife complex at 40-50 E. Long St., reawakened June 10 with six connected clubs totaling 24,000 square feet. The same strip held the city's hottest nightlife destination around the turn of the century - and it could become just as hip a second time.

"We're still trying to create a safe, fun thing to do Downtown," said Chris Corso, a principal with the CGS Group, which operates Long Street District and bars on Park Street.

Corso and his business partners started transforming Long Street in 2000, then sold the six bars in 2006 to focus on the Arena District. The clubs suffered under new management and eventually were shuttered last May.

With Park Street at capacity and the Long Street buildings in need of new energy, Corso and company wanted to reignite their Downtown empire.

They seem to be on their way.

For much of last Saturday night, lines stretched between the outdoor patios and a security detail, while a young dude and his megaphone directed foot traffic to different entrances.

Like the Park Street Complex, Long Street's connected clubs create a winding labyrinth of sights, sounds and things to sip. Curiosity and a series of hallways will lead you from a satiny lounge at the western end through several dance clubs and into a small party room on the other end.

Rooms boast their own entertainment and unique decor to accommodate crowds looking to sit and seduce, bust a move or gawk at video DJs artfully splicing sounds and pictures. Prettier, glitzier, more alluring environments have emerged from ones that had fallen into disrepair.

It might take a bit to shake that stigma, but Long Street Live has dusted off a dance-club experience sorely lacking in the urban core.