When The Lindsay cleared their songwriting vault with 2009's "Syrup Bag" EP, singer-bassist Gretchen Tepper promised the tunes under construction for the band's next album would be slower, quieter works not fit for head-banging and air guitar.

When The Lindsay cleared their songwriting vault with 2009's "Syrup Bag" EP, singer-bassist Gretchen Tepper promised the tunes under construction for the band's next album would be slower, quieter works not fit for head-banging and air guitar.

And while "Deep in the Queue," the long-awaited follow-up to 2006 debut "Dragged Out," delivers on Tepper's promise of dirge-y slow jams, it also offers everything else the Columbus rock quartet is known for.

"We can be soft, we can be tender, we can be loud, we can be obnoxious," Tepper said.

For an album with only eight tracks over 37 minutes, "Deep in the Queue" is relatively sprawling. The album combines The Lindsay's usual influences - jangly psych nuggets, guitar-powered '80s indie rock a la Sonic Youth, grimy Columbus drunk-punk - and spins them out in myriad directions, each to be explored at Saturday's release party at The Summit.

It all sounds unmistakably like The Lindsay, but the selection is diverse enough that at first singer-guitarist John Olexovitch struggled to see how these songs fit together if not for their shared subject matter.

"All of the songs are pretty much about getting older," Olexovitch said. "I'd rather stay in than go out. That was kind of a new feeling for all of us."

That's not to say they're growing turgid with age. If anything bonds The Lindsay, it's basketball, a pastime Tepper has to go without for now thanks to a baby due in September.

"We are willing to take on any band in Columbus in a three-on-three game," drummer Jimmy Lavery said. "Probably not four-on-four now, for a few months, until Gretchen can play balls-out again. For now, we'll definitely play anybody three-on-three."